Adidas Ultra Boost X

Adidas Ultra Boost X – Shoe Review

“Disclaimer: I received a pair of Adidas Ultra Boost X to review as part of being a BibRave Pro. Learn more about becoming a BibRave Pro (ambassador), and check out BibRave.com to review find and write race reviews!”

I have a go to running shoe, but I am always searching for another one. When the opportunity came up to test this shoe, I jumped on it. This shoe is different and I was curious.

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Note: I am not a shoe expert, or novice runner – however I have logged a few miles over the years. I always tell new runners to get properly fitted for a shoe that works for you. I hope this review doesn’t confuse that tip, but it tells you about the many styles of shoes available to you, when you go to your local Dick’s Sporting Goods to try them out.

First Impressions: The shoes arrived in a yellow box with the Adidas stripping. I opened it up to find my gray/white shoes inside. To me, at fist glance they looked like a sock attached to a foam pad.

After further inspection, I noticed the arch. It was not attached to the sole. I could stick my hand in the void. I also noticed the lacing system, it was this hard plastic piece on the outside of the sock, with 4 holes. The bottom was also stamped “Continental” like the tire company.

For all the technical specs, I add this from the website:

  • Runner type: neutral
  • adidas Primeknit upper wraps the foot in adaptive support and ultralight comfort
  • boost™ is our most responsive cushioning ever: The more energy you give, the more you get
  • STRETCHWEB rubber outsole flexes underfoot for an energized ride
  • Dynamic arch for adaptive fit; TORSION® SYSTEM between the heel and forefoot for a stable ride
  • Continental™ Rubber outsole for extraordinary grip in wet and dry conditions
  • Weight: 8.3 ounces (size 7)
  • Midsole drop: 10 mm (heel: 29 mm / forefoot: 19 mm)
  • Imported

*The floating arch is designed to respond to the way your foot moves, and the shoes are specifically designed for a woman.

Information on the boost technology – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6icItMrGasY

Background on me. I do best with a neutral shoe. I have collapsing arches, which was a concern, will this be a shoe that works with that or the opposite?

According to Strava, which means the times I remembered to log my runs wearing these shoes, I have logged 48.1 miles. Those miles include the following runs:

May 11, first run, 3 miles on the rail trail. When I put them on for the first time, I noticed the fit around my arch. The first mile, my arch was irritated. I really felt I was running on a foam board. The part that goes around my ankle is like a sock and wont rub my ankle bone. I was wearing tall compression socks.

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I joined the running club’s Couch to 5k program later that evening, and put these shoes back on. I think it was a total of near 2 miles on my feet. The slower pace and the added walking did not aggravate my arch, and I had no issues.

May 12. 7 miles on the crushed limestone trail. Ok, I should be breaking these in, with smaller runs…but there was a part of me that was like, the more I wear shoes, the better they feel. I had the arch irritation within the first mile, but it went away. Around mile 3, I had a strange “hot spot” feeling in my left foot. It is the part just under the big toe, where my foot lands. There was no blister developing, it was uncomfortable. By the time I was almost done, I had to stop and take a break and rub my foot. I was wearing low socks.

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May 16. 4 miles on the trail. I was wearing just some regular low socks. I didn’t have any arch irritation. After a mile, my feet both had what I will continue to call “hot spots.” The soles were just irritated. This is when I stopped and removed my socks – relief! This is the time I realized that I can’t wear thick socks with these shoes, and I can’t tie them tight. I ran the rest of my run with no socks, I could feel the seam in the back rubbing my ankle, and was worried I would get a blister, but thankfully nothing. I did like the feel with no socks. However around mile 3.5 I had the “hot spot” on my left foot again.


The lacing system, with only 4 holes is why I had them tight, I am used to a higher hole on shoes, that allows me to lock my heel into the shoe, so there is no slipping, this shoe the highest hole is still across the top of my foot, tying it too tight just irritates my foot. Letting the laces out for a looser fit made my feet feel better, but my heel slips and the shoe feels like it will fall off. Getting the right lacing tightness is key.


May 19. 3 miles on crushed limestone. I made sure to wear thin socks and tie them loosely. My feet felt good, but my heel slipped, and the socks kept sliding down into the shoe. I split my mileage up for the day, so I wore the shoes until my next run later, the shoes feel fine, light weight and comfy for walking around. My socks though kept slipping into the shoe.


-Second run of the day, ran my first 3 miles on the pavement. They felt good, no issues.


May 22. 3 miles, crushed limestone trail. Can’t have shoes tied too tight or my feet hurt, can’t have too loose and my shoe slips on the heel.


May 23. 6 miles, crushed limestone trail. Irritation on left foot again, but at the end of my run. I wore my tall compression socks and didn’t tie them too tight.


Somewhere in this journey, my PF has been bothering me in my right foot. Now this is where I would tell everyone to stop running in these shoes, but since it wasn’t super painful. I kept going.

May 27. Run Madtown Twilight 10k. First race in the shoe. This was a gamble, I knew I would be able to finish the race, but I wasn’t sure about racing in the shoes. I wore my tall compression socks as I knew there wouldn’t be issues with those. I tied them loosely and in double knots.


I got over the feeling that they were too loose, and they were going to fall off. I was having a good time, pushing my pace. I could feel the responsiveness. Then about halfway, one shoe came untied. Having to stop and tie my shoe took away my mojo. Around the 5 mile mark, I had the pain in my left foot. After I was done running, the pain went away.

May 30. 3.5 miles, crushed limestone trail. No issues until I was ending the run, and that pain in the left foot was there.


June 5. 5 miles. Slight PF pain, arch hurts. However I notice how springy the shoe is.

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June 9. pavement. No pain issues until around the 3rd mile and that spot on my left foot hurts. I had to stop and take a phone call, when I started again there was no pain.


As you can see, I have mixed feelings with these shoes. I really like how the sock like structure fits, and allows my toes room to splay a little, but I don’t think it works for my foot.

  • I am used to wearing any sock I want and never having issues with bulkiness or blisters. I have to make sure to wear a thinner sock that wont slip.
  • As far as the arch fit, I am guessing my collapsing arch needs space to collapse? I was guessing the tight fit would offer more support like the inserts I had custom made for my work shoes.
  • I also am wondering what the heck the pain is in my left foot, and why is it only that foot?
  • I liked racing in them, I really felt for those first few miles I was getting back what I was putting into them.
  • I never logged anything longer than 7 miles, for me these are best on shorter runs.
  • I can’t get them to be as tight as I like, the lacing system only has 4 holes.

Conclusion: These shoes look different and cool, they are light weight and stretchy. However, they are not a running shoe that works for me. I will continue to wear them here and there for a short run, and to walk in.

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If you still need more information, I encourage you to read the reviews written by these ladies: JeannineHeather WAmy WJennaLindsey  – GIna

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You can find them at Dick’s Sporting Goods, where you can get your hands on them, try them on, and see if they fit for you. They are also available for sale on the web.

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5 thoughts on “Adidas Ultra Boost X

  1. Nice review! I would agree about the shorter runs for sure! I noticed an aggravation when I increased my mileage!

  2. Pingback: UltraBoostX – Running shoe review – A Girl on a Search for Adventure

  3. Pingback: Adidas UltraBoost X | Review – livinglovingrunner

  4. Pingback: Gear Review: Adidas Ultra Boost X - Everything But Weddings

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